So here’s my product review, purchase me maybe?

The internet has made consumers more empowered and businesses more accountable than ever. Businesses can no longer hide from the truth and as a result we now have legitimate power to make an educated and well-informed decision on the products we purchase.

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Whether it’s purchasing cosmetics, hotels or electronics, we’ve all been in the situation where we have had to jump online for a quick review. For me, a review is essential for any purchase I make. If it’s a restaurant I’ll head to Zomato or for hotels i’ll hit up TripAdvisor, however no matter what, I’ll know every detail about what I am buying before I make my purchase. We’ve become a society that values making an informed decision and businesses have been forced to adapt.

Managing online reviews has become one of the biggest challenges for businesses. As suggested in the article When Positive Product Reviews Backfire for Retailers, businesses have to strategically manage their reviews to ensure they appear legitimate and honest. Deleting bad reviews and only leaving the good ones can make an organisation seem dishonest. Consumers want to read unbiased reviews that show both the good and bad about the products they are purchasing, therefore by aggravating angry customers, businesses can push consumers to find alternative avenues to be heard with many heading to social media.

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Looking at the Australian fashion brand Shakuhachi, who over the past year has received significant online backlash, we can see a great example of how difficult it is for businesses to now run from their mistakes. Currently Shakuhachi has a productreview.com rating of 1.1 and an Instagram page riddled with complaints. This Australian brand evidently brought this negativity upon themselves by running a lengthy and vigorous sale promotions campaign, where they listed their expensive pieces of clothing for up 60% off and as a result became inundated with orders they could not fulfil. Shakuhachi, like many other brands chose to promptly delete these unfavourable comments on their Instagram page creating even greater backlash and eventually causing their tumultuous fall.

So let me know your thoughts. Do you read products reviews? If so, how confident are you that they are truthful?

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12 thoughts on “So here’s my product review, purchase me maybe?

  1. Usually it depends on the item I am buying, I have recently become an avid online shopper. Yet I tend to use the star ratting of sellers for purchases on ebay as an indication of how reliable a product is. For department store online shopping, I trust in buying from Myer as I work there and have built the rapport from years of trust as appose to online reviews.

    However, I will base my holiday searching almost entirely on online comments as appose to a travel agent and also like to review make up online (such as Kylie cosmetics) based off reviews and swatches as the products are not as easily available. I think it is important for companies to be honest and transparent, with good and bad feedback. A great read!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a really interesting point. For those brand you trust a review is less important however for the brands who choose not to provide/allow reviews on their product it can almost deter you from purchasing their product as they appear to be hiding something.

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  2. So did the brand eventually go out of business? great article we are certainly in a tricky age with the online world. At the same time there is a lot of misinformation out there as well, however a big lesson can be learnt from branding. That is to take immediate ownership of your mistakes and be transparent, otherwise the market will be quite harsh.
    Great post,
    Eddie

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    1. Hi Eddie, yes the brand has gone into liquidation with significant debt (for further information here’s the article http://www.news.com.au/finance/small-business/fashion-designer-jessica-white-of-liquidated-shakuhachi-lives-the-high-life-in-bali-while-owing-1-million/news-story/2004bbb1654c97d98d39aee3a1ab281c). Exactly right though, as seen in this case and many others I think the biggest mistake a company can do is ignore the negative feedback and not address it!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Joel

    I think this is one of the greatest revelations that the emergence of the internet has bought society. When I originally started studying business I felt as though marketing, specifically advertising was often a form of deceit. However with such transparency nowadays through reviews and online comments, marketing is forced to focus much more on developing a quality product or service that consumers see as valuable rather than just saying it is and selling it unfairly.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well said Joel! Interesting point you make there that the internet has really benefited the consumer as we can now see exactly what we are purchasing rather than the curated descriptions given by companies.

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    1. I review in both instances. I have become quite dependent on reviews and therefore I always try to make the time to review when I’ve had a really good experience because I know I appreciate when others do the same!

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  4. I nearly always read product reviews for merely entertainment purposes, I find it so interesting how consumers can have such varied level of expectation or dedication to the product! I sometimes obviously take the hint if nearly all the reviews are 1 star and horrible, if there a mixed bag of reviews I’ll still give it a go, however, it there is exceptional results (e.g. 5 stars for every comments) I either become skeptical in the genuineness of the post or if the product is over hyped.

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    1. I definitely do the same! I think it’s interesting to see reviews from those who just simply want to complain for the sake of complaining and I think most of us are smart enough to ignore these reviews.

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